We started as a small college to serve rural and low-income students from the Lower Valley, many of them the first of their families to receive any higher education. Now, Heritage University, provides students the opportunity to study in more than 40 undergraduate and graduate degree programs where bright, hardworking students from throughout the entire Yakima Valley and beyond work alongside passionate faculty and staff to fulfill their potential for the betterment of their communities and the world.

Heritage's growth, while impressive, has not kept pace with the eight-fold increase in newcomer Washingtonians. The state and the nation have gotten more diverse, more populous and more full of promising first-generation college students. There's a greater demand for excellent and affordable higher education, as well as for more college-educated workers to fill the jobs of today and tomorrow.

In order to maintain a leadership role, we are looking ahead.

Since 2010, when Dr. John Bassett became president of Heritage, we've hired more than 30 new faculty and administrative leaders, attracting to Heritage top talent from Washington and across the nation. And now the university's board has approved a comprehensive campaign to fund plans that will allow the University to grow and keep pace with the demands of our state and create a learning environment that graduates leaders who meet the needs of the 21st-century employers.

Our campaign for growth consists of four pillars:
(1) campus construction; (2) expanded scholarship support; (3) enhanced academic programs and student services; and (4) increased service to the Yakima Valley. By focusing on these areas, we hope to achieve the greatest good for our students, their families and the community.




Heritage has grown substantially since it began in a 1928-era single classroom 34 years ago. Developed piecemeal over time the bulk of our classrooms were housed in temporary, portable buildings that by 2010 were falling apart, crowded and expensive to operate and maintain.

In July of 2012 a fire destroyed the oldest building on campus and with it seven classrooms, all food service facilities, the core IT facilities, the central phone system, the bookstore, and the main student gathering hall. The fires were devastating. But out of the flames arose the opportunity to create a new master plan, one that would let us remove buildings that were beyond their usable life and create a 21st century campus to support 21st century learning.

The core buildings on campus have now been rebuilt, but there is still a need for additional facilities as our enrollment grows and we endeavor to enhance our students' college experience.

Investment opportunities:
    -
-
-
  
Improve waste water treatment to accommodate growing enrollment
Build student support and activity facilities
Update and expand existing Early Childhood Learning Center to function as a lab school for Heritage students and serve local families.

 




Students fund their education through a combination of student debt, State and Federal aid and private scholarships. As debt burdens grow and public support weakens, the most critical source for keeping college affordable is private financial aid. Heritage is committed to increasing financial aid to our students to facilitate their graduation success.

Investment opportunities:
    -
-

Increase student financial aid by a total of $11,000,000 over 5 years
Increase the scholarship endowment by $5,000,000
 





Creating pathways to success for first generation college students is the hallmark of a Heritage education. Increasingly, first generation college students are one of the most important and most overlooked sources for creating a skilled and effective 21st century workforce. For them to reach their potential they require strong, smart, and effective personal attention at every point in their academic career - from recruitment, pre-college preparation and declaration of major - to professional internships, career counseling, on-line degree completion, and job placement.

Graduating students who are prepared for productive and satisfying careers requires diverse course offerings matched to high need fields, excellent research and internships opportunities, outstanding professors, and student support services that help students manage the unexpected life challenges that can derail success.

Our students also require flexible classes that match their busy schedules which includes in-person, online and blended teaching strategies that fit the student and his or her chosen career.

Heritage University provides a pathway to success for our students through personal attention from recruitment through degree completion into the workforce.

Investment in this area include:
    -
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

-

Expanded course offerings in healthcare
Expanded programs in business and environmental sciences
Expanded college bridge program
Expanded intern and career placement programs
Expanded library and digital resource materials
Funding the Writing and Academic Skills Center tutoring program
Supporting the Honors Program
Endowment of professorships in Spanish and Native American/Indigenous Studies
Pioneering reinventions of programs in education for teachers and principals
Funding observation technology for student teachers to reduce expenses and provide enhanced learning opportunities
Funding the annual Seattle Shakespeare Company visit

 



Heritage is a vital asset for the communities we're part of - the Yakima Valley and the Yakama Nation. The University has launched two centers to support community development in these areas.

The Center for a New Washington (CNW) extends the academic resources of Heritage University to improve quality of life in the surrounding area. It is a place where creative practitioners and researchers meet to explore innovative and practical solutions to challenges faced by our state and region. As the University helps build brighter futures for its students, CNW helps build the brightest possible future for the region and the State.

Center for a New Washington investment opportunities include:
 
- Research projects, visiting speakers, forums, and seminars that focus on challenges related to economic development, K-12 education, health care, energy, the environment, effective government and families.  

The Center for Indigenous Health, Culture and the Environment investments will support its goals of:
-

-

-

 - 
Conducting interdisciplinary health resources that addresses root causes of health disparities in order to promote community health and well-being.
Establishing partnerships and collaborative projects with tribal and community members and, by extension, among other Native American communities.
Promoting self-determined Native American communities, with a special emphasis on supporting community-led initiatives for Yakama language and cultural revitalization.
Hosting and sponsoring seminars and workshops to address Native American health and language issues and 
the challenges.